Why subscribe?

At Aerology, we’re training deep learning algorithms to predict air travel disruption and developing a mobile app to democratize those predictions. While we’re building (and automating), we’ll manually synthesize things here: that means interpreting weather forecasts, flight schedules and airport capacity to derive some rough disruption probabilities. While we have a geeky interest in the national airspace system—and suspect many of our subscribers do, too—we also hope some post views result in saved trips. Airlines have recently eliminated change fees and we’ll occasionally encourage readers to take advantage of this improved rebooking flexibility (a fare difference may still apply, though tackling that problem is part of our product roadmap).

What to expect?

We’ll publish outlooks for peak travel days and high-impact weather events. We discuss weather features, put a prediction band of sorts around arrival rates, model average delays and speculate how any delays might be administered; not counting our much-loved footnotes, we aim for a 5 minute read. Uncertainty abounds in the airspace system and we do our best to communicate the range of possible outcomes (we’re having fun designing our mobile app accordingly).

We also write explainers to illuminate the mechanics and themes that underpin airline operations. Lastly, we’re active on Twitter, where we attempt to craft tweet-sized outlooks for smaller travel occasions!

There’s no paywall. Subscribe for free to receive new posts in your inbox.

Who writes for Aerology?

At the outset, Tim Donohue will do most of the writing. Tim brings domain expertise to Aerology, having most recently lead United’s Station Operations organization at Newark Airport (don’t hold it against him). Aerology’s technical team members are busy writing code, though may sometimes author a guest post.


People

Tim Donohue
Formerly ran United's Operations Center at EWR; UA Network Planning analyst before that. Currently co-founding Aerology to save missed connections, canceled trips and lengthy delays.